London Mithraeum

The London Mithraeum is one of the most important archaeological finds from Roman times in London, England. The sanctuary dedicated to Mithras (called Mithraeum) was discovered in 1954 during construction work on Walbrook.

london mithraeum

The London Mithraeum is one of the most important archaeological finds from Roman times in London, England. The sanctuary dedicated to Mithras (called Mithraeum) was discovered in 1954 during construction work on Walbrook, a street in the City of London. The Mithraeum was built in the middle of the 3rd century, in the early fourth century it was possibly rededicated in honour of Bacchus.

The excavations were carried out by the Archaeological Service of the Museum of London. Several figures of gods made of white marble imported from Italy, such as Minerva, Mercurius, Serapis and Mithras themselves as well as Venus figures made on site from clay.

The Mithraeum originally stood on the eastern bank of the Walbrook, a creek that now flows underground. Since the Mithraeum stood in the way of a construction project, the entire excavated site was moved a few dozen meters to Queen Victoria Street. There the ruins could be viewed publicly. As part of a new building (“Bloomberg building”), the excavations were moved back to the original location and integrated into a new exhibition that opened in November 2017.

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