Rødtangen Dolmen

The Rødtangen Dolmen (also known as Bråtan) is situated along the coast in the municipality of Asker, within the Viken province of Norway.

Rødtangen Dolmen

The Rødtangen Dolmen (also known as Bråtan) is situated along the coast in the municipality of Asker, within the Viken province of Norway. Archaeological findings, including fragments of well-known ceramic types, indicate that the dolmen dates back to the middle phase of the Funnel Beaker Culture (TBK). Local influences are evident from the discovery of flint flakes and slate objects.

The dolmen bears a striking resemblance to Sweden’s Haga dolmen. Presently, it consists of two taller and two detached stone slabs forming an irregular square shape, with the capstone missing. The original mound that once covered the dolmen is now marked by a ring of smaller stones. The entrance is defined by two long stones. Although an excavation took place, only a few pieces of flint were unearthed. Nearby, a defunct dolmen yielded amber beads, arrowheads, and pottery, while pottery remains were also discovered in the Skjeltorp dolmen in Østfold.

Rødtangen is among the five dolmens in Norway, all located near the border with Sweden. Four of these dolmens were formerly in the province of Buskerud, but only two of them have survived. Notably, Rødtangen is the sole dolmen that remains in its original location.

Close by, the Gravrøys from Rødtangen stands with a diameter ranging from 15 to 20 meters and a height between 2 and 3 meters. In the center, an uncovered and opened stone box can be observed. While the exact dating of this tomb remains uncertain, based on other burial mounds in the area, it is believed to have originated from either the Bronze Age or the early Iron Age.

  • References

    Image: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Dolmen_at_R%C3%B8dtangen,_Norway.JPG

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